Analogue Tools

Analogue Tools

Despite generally having an iPad and an iPhone to hand almost all the time I don't take all my notes digitally. I've found that it's not always appropriate to start tapping away on your phone (people mind less if you scribble into a book), it looks a little less conspicuous, and sometimes its easier to just handwrite whatever it is that's on your mind/is being explained.

I used to use Moleskine notebooks, but they aren't actually of the greatest quality. I have used a couple of alternatives and settled on a favourite when experimenting with Bullet Journalling last year. I'm also picky about my pens. My everyday carry, usually stored in my work bag is as follows:

  • Leuchtturm 1917 dotted A5 Notebook,
  • Uniball Signo Gel Grip 0.7mm rollerball pens (UM151) in black and red,
  • Uniball Kuru Toga 0.5mm self sharpening mechanical pencil.

I employ a couple of simple conventions when notemaking:

I date each entry at the top left of the page in black, and title entries in red, so it's clear when a new entry starts and I know, of course, when it was written (useful if I revisit a subject). Red is then reserved for items of particular significance/high importance.

I also use the Dash/Plus metadata notation system to keep track of notes that involve tasks or actions. It's a neat little shorthand method — and I also find it looks much neater if I use dashes as delineators instead of trying to draw neat and uniform bullets, dots, or circles which I cannot do consistently. You can also use Dash/Plus for Bullet Journalling if you're so inclined.

Bear

Bear

The Benefits of Email

The Benefits of Email