Notebooks

I recently checked a long-neglected to-do off my list, and finally bought a couple of fresh notebooks. I'm a pretty digital kinda guy, and will always have something to hand that I can type into: my phone, Macbook, etc. This isn't always appropriate or convenient however. I also made a point of grabbing some gel ink pens based on recommendations on the internet; I have a lot of pretty nerdy bookmarks in Safari. There's something nice about hand written words, and it's not something that I get to experience a lot anymore. I'm (allegedly) a software developer, and I do a certain amount of other writing (obviously), but virtually all of it is typed. Indeed handwriting for an extended period tends to cause me some pain — the legacy of a mis-spent youth cybernetically integrated, or so you might think, with a Nintendo games console plus an education and career that is decidedly computing-based.

You may not be able to read a doctor’s handwriting and prescription, but you’ll notice his bills are neatly typewritten.
— Earl Wilson

There are times when pulling out your smartphone is not socially or professionally appropriate, but scribbling into a notebook briefly will seem somewhat less ignorant (so long as your nose isn't in there for 20 minutes). It's also true that the novelty and enjoyment of hand writing, when it is so uncommon, is a catalyst for activity. I've sat and filled pages with ideas that I had struggled to get into words beforehand, and while I will at some point need to digitise some of those notes, they exist now where as they did not before. I'm lucky in that my handwriting even now is exceptionally legible; I have a bold, rounded hand that anyone can read, just sparing little flare or style.

So I'm resolved to keeping a notebook handy much more often, and making a point of enjoying the novelty for so long as it lasts.

It's dead, Tim.

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